United World Infrastructure’s Smart Cities Focus On Citizens And Progressive Technology

By incorporating ICT solutions including, smart grids, smart metering, renewable energy solutions, and smart energy storage and backup systems into the city’s energy infrastructure, and by utilizing the output data and analytics, city administrators would be able to reduce consumptions, monitor supply and demand and make relevant assessments for future capacity,” says UWI’s Technical Director Amr Youssef.

21 Apr 2016 Zawya

United World Infrastructure (UWI), is a global infrastructure investment and development company with operations in Dubai and headquarters in Washington DC. The company collaborates with governments worldwide to acquire, invest in, design, build, and operate new clusters, cities, regional hubs, themed developments and other real-estate and infrastructure assets.

With an overwhelming 70 percent of the world’s population presumed to be living in cities by 2050, Smart City enhancements have become an integral part of UWI’s offerings.

UWI’s vision for a Smart City is informed by the latest technologies, research and developments in the field. Progressive Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Infrastructure, allows smart devices such as smart phones and automobiles to connect to smart infrastructure such as smart power grid, parking systems, traffic management, ‎and home automation and control devices.

Civic Engagement in the form of feedback from the community, allows citizens to voice concerns and actively contribute to a problem-free environment through feedback applications. The Smart Service Delivery Model provides citizens with efficient services to enhance liveability. These include superior sustainability solutions like smart LED street lights that dim according to pedestrian and vehicle movement patterns, automated waste removal services, smart parking solutions through sensors, e-learning and smart education solutions, and in-home patient doctor interaction via smart devices.

“Smart Cities are capable of providing the most efficient, reliable, and sustainable energy supply systems to new city developments,” says Amr Youssef, who serves as Director of Technical Operations at UWI. “By incorporating ICT solutions including, smart grids, smart metering, renewable energy solutions, and smart energy storage and backup systems into the city’s energy infrastructure, and by utilizing the output data and analytics, city administrators would be able to reduce consumptions, monitor supply and demand and make relevant assessments for future capacity,” says Youssef.

Medini, one of UWI’s keynote investment projects, is currently implementing Smart City initiatives in Malaysia.  Smart mobility, electronic vehicles, a community portal, smart structures, and an integrated operating centre are being piloted at present. “Our goal is to deliver smart solutions to citizens who live, work and  visit Medini to enhance quality living,” says managing director and CEO Ir. Khairil Anwar Ahmad, of Medini Iskandar Malaysia. “We bring soul into the community. It’s not only about building multi-story towers and infrastructure but rather about the people who come to live and spend time in the city as a community,” says Ahmad.

With consideration to a recent report by Grand View Research, it is anticipated that the global smart cities market will reach $1.4 trillion in 2020, nearly tripling the global market size of $568 billion in 2013. With the rising demand for smart cities, UWI recognises the critical need for smart intervention at large-scale city development and singular building levels.

“We believe in building cities that are liveable, efficient, connected and, most importantly, a safe place for people to call home,” says Vafa Valapour, who leads strategic investments in real estate and infrastructure assets, and guides business initiatives at UWI. “Our recently launched Ghana Gold Cityincorporates an array of  Smart City services that will be offered for the very first time in Ghana,” says Valapour.

By means of applied technological advances, it is now the Smart City paradigm which drives our analysis and development in an urbanising world where economies, governments, societies and environmentalists take active interest in offering citizens access to better services.